Hunger Is Not a Disease

This Thanksgiving – A Blessing of Opportunity

 

This Thanksgiving I’m grateful for the clothes on my back.

This Thanksgiving I’m grateful for my health.

This Thanksgiving I’m grateful for food which is available to me and to those who rely on the resources and generosity of others for the basic necessities we need to continue our lives.

The available food reminds me that we all live in the abundance of this time and place.

Thanksgiving, for me, is  an opportunity to welcome the coming new year:  hope and new beginnings arrive in January.  The energy of this Thanksgiving gives me strength to gather energy for that prayer.

I’m holding on to the healing,  wellness, and regeneration we will  all experience as the Pandemic finally moves on.

I’m waiting for the blessings which will come my way as the Pandemic exits and leaves space for the new reality we will  experience in its place.

And, I have to admit, I’m excited to experience our new reality.  In my heart of hearts, I feel we’re never going back.  We’re going forward, instead, to something new and different and better.

I’m grateful to be here, to be connected to all the efforts of the many people working for those who need food and housing.  I appreciate the support I continue to receive from people I’ve come to know in this world.

This Thanksgiving I’m grateful for you.   I feel a kinship in your readership so that, in my search to spread the word about hunger in our country, I know that I am never alone.

Thank You.

Please forward this article to your preferred social media network.

Thurman Greco

 

 

 

 

 

Hungry and Homeless Now

 

The food pantry is closed for business and  will not open today.

Where will the hungry and homeless go now?

It’s Wednesday, the pantry day in Woodstock.  Weekly, the food pantry attracts several hundred hungry and homeless people to the basement of a local church where they experience community, gratitude, healing, and a three-day-supply of shared food.  The isolation often felt by hungry and homeless people is softened in the pantry.  One thing the soul longs for is connection.

As people travel down their life path to the pantry, they lose things.  One of the most soul-strangling downsides of this new-found simplicity is isolation experienced as people become cut off from their community.  This experiences always changes reality.

When people no longer fit in, their voices become smaller and smaller and smaller until, finally, all is silent.

The rule is this:  As the community for the hungry and homeless diminishes, so diminishes the support system.

All things are connected and intertwined but we have a difficult time remembering this when we are in our most alone circumstances in life.  With assistance, we begin to recall our spiritual connections and know we are not along, not forgotten.

But, with the Coronavirus, this is very challenging.  A few things are in play here.

First, for those needing to shelter in place, the main question is this:   ” Where will I go?”  Sofa surfing won’t happen anymore.  The cemetery will work as long as it doesn’t snow or rain.

Second, a person without food can think of nothing else:  “Where can I get food?”

For the hungry and homeless person in Woodstock, that focus is real because the food pantry closed.

At a time when the people need this food the most, the pantry is closed.

“Where can I get food?”

Thank you for reading this blog post!

Please refer it to your preferred social  media network.

Thurman Greco

Woodstock, New York

Preventing Senior Hunger

For years, I’ve been blogging and writing books about hunger in America in general and senior hunger specifically.

Senior hunger is not going away anytime soon.

If you read my blog posts, then you are probably interested in senior hunger.  Recently I came across a guide which you will want to read.

To learn more about senior hunger,  access it here:  https://onlinegrad.baylor.edu/resources/seniors-food-insecurity-hunger/

Thanks for reading this article and thanks for your interest and action.

I hope you’ll not only read this article but will also share it wherever you feel it might be appropriate.

This new resource may be of interest to readers everywhere.  The goal is to help open a dialogue in our country about senior hunger.

Thank you for your time and thank you for your concern about seniors and hunger.

Thurman Greco

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