Hunger Is Not a Disease

Our Earth, Ourselves, and the September Solstice

This is the time of the September Solstice.  On this week, please take a moment to visualize a world where good health, positive renewal exist.  See a world with enough food, housing, health care, and education.

See adequate housing, nutritious food, and reliable quality health care become  real  for everyone.

Reflect on a world where goals and dreams of everyone become  achievable.  Spread seeds of hope and growth throughout our planet.  Include abundance for those with insufficient resources for housing, food, and healthcare.

Honor the change of seasons which is upon us now.  Breathe in deeply the smells and feel of autumn.

Give yourself the support you need to achieve your personal goals.  Invite balance and abundance into your life.

See a world where all beings live and thrive in peace and harmony.

Include a world where social justice prevails.

Include a world where the hungry are fed.

Thank you for reading this meditation.

Please refer this article to your preferred social media network.  Please forward this post to friends who might enjoy this post.

You can connect with me on Facebook.

Thanks again.

Thurman Greco

 

 

 

Meet Anna Woofenden – You’re Gonna LOVE Her and Her Book!

 

 

INTRODUCTION –

There aren’t many books about there about hunger in America.  Whenever I think of books about food pantries, the first writer I think of Sara Miles.

Well, it turns out that Sara Miles has a special friend, a writer friend.

I found Anna Woofenden’s book, “This is God’s Table” by accident on a table at the Barnes and Noble store in Kingston, New York.  If only I could give copies of Anna Woofenden’s  book to everyone.  And, I mean everyone, including you.

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Anna Woofenden started a Garden Church without walls in a vacant lot on 6th Street in San Pedro, California.

Anna placed a cedar stump table in the center of her worship space and consecrated it when she anointed it with oil.

From that moment, people joined her as they gardened,  worshiped, and ate together weekly.  All were welcome at God’s Table.

Whenever everyone is welcome,  they all come.  This welcoming,  worshiping, and eating together attracts  the old and the young, the housed and unhoused, the rich and the poor, and everyone in between.

I invite you to get a copy of Anna Woofenden’s book,  “This is God’s Table”,  and read it.

You can connect with her at https://www.AnnaWoofenden.com.

Again, thank you for reading this blog post.

If you liked this post, will you please forward it to your favorite social media network?

You can connect with me on Facebook.

Thanks again!

Thurman Greco

 

Did your landlord reduce your rent?

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I got an email survey question yesterday.

“Did your landlord reduce your rent?”

Somehow, I can’t get this question out of my head.  It just keeps grabbing my attention at every opportunity.  What a question!

The answer is “NO!”

No landlord has lowered anyone’s rent in this area.  Rents are going up, up, and up.  In fact, rents are disappearing.

My landlord is evicting my neighbors.  They live in  one half of the duplex next door.    The other side is air bnb…or maybe vrbo…or any one of several other vacation rental apps so popular on everyone’s computer and phone.

Until last year, both sides of the duplex were vacation rentals.  Then, the town supervisor cracked down on them so the landlady  made one side a monthly rental.

Immediately, a lovely young couple moved in.  They are the perfect tenants.  No noise, no clutter, no smells, no noisy children.  Their footprint is the smallest they can manage.

Well, small footprint or no footprint, their days are numbered.

I see them packing up their possessions and driving them away – a few cartons every day.  The boxes are going to a storage unit until they can find a new place to live.  So far, they’ve had no luck.

They want to stay in Woodstock because this is their home town.  Growing up, Gaby skated and bicycled on every street in this town.

Well, there are no places to rent in this town.  Woodstock is a vacation rental town all the way.

This lovely young couple seeks shelter in other communities:  Palenville, Catskill, Athens.

Meanwhile,  the landlord eagerly advertises both units as vacation rentals.  The young couple must go.  His list of eager vacationer applicants  is long.  He’s sorry the young couple has no home.

But, life must continue.

Thank you for reading this article.

Please refer it to your preferred social media network.

Thurman Greco

Woodstock, New York

 

Paul, Duct Tape, and Homelessness

Paul has been on my mind all week.

One of my oldest friends,  I  knew him and worked with him when I worked and lived in Virginia – just outside Washington D.C.

Back then, we had Kelly Girls.   Paul was my very best Kelly Girl.  I could send him anywhere – well, not to the male chauvinist lawyer  who would only pay for a cute legal secretary.  But all the others loved his work.

He showed up on time for his assignments and he turned out a perfect work product.  He was a bargain.  Whatever he did, he made the client feel that Paul gave more than the money’s worth for every job done.

Everyone knew  Paul was homeless.  Nobody cared.  He was the best typist out there.  (This was before computers, you understand.)  A quality work product counts for a lot when it comes time to pay the bill, after all.

So why have I been thinking about Paul all week?  It was the Duct Tape that did it.  My watch band broke and I need the watch.  I drove over to Genter’s Jewelry Store in Saugerties and discovered a “for rent” sign where the “open” sign used to be.  Mr. Genter always fixed everything .  He didn’t care whether it was a watch band, a clock, a necklace.

He also sold silver and gold chains at bargain prices.  And, he custom designed a coin for me.  His work was exacting.  Genter’s  was my go-to destination for all things jewelry.

Genter’s is a statistic of the Coronavirus.   With Mr. Genter gone, what was I going to do?   I physically grieved when I saw the sign in the window.

I went straight for the Duct Tape.  I now wear a watch held together with Duct Tape.  I’m getting used to it, actually.  My sense of urgency  diminishes a little more each day.

I’m sure I’ll get along just fine with the Duct Tape.  Paul Did.

Duct Tape adorned most of Paul’s clothes and anything else he used.  Duct Tape held Paul’s shoes together.  Duct Tape held the watch on Paul’s arm.  Duct tape even kept Paul’s eyeglasses going.  Finally, Duct Tape held Paul’s winter coat together.

So, following in Paul’s example, Duct Tape will keep my fitness watch going.

I rather like my new Duct Tape look.  And, I like remembering Paul.  He always made me smile.  And, smiles these days are hard to come by.

Thanks Paul!  You set a good example.  This Duct Tape will work until I can find Mr. Genter, just as Duct Tape held your shoes together until you could find a newer used pair  of shoes.

And, thank you for reading this article.  Please forward it to your preferred social media network.

Thurman Greco

Woodstock, New York

PS:  You can order one or more of the fancy T-shirts pictured in this post today at :

www.thurmangreco.com.

I also wrote about Paul in “No Fixed Address.”

 

Miracles – Because Hunger is Not a Disease

Miracles happened in the food pantry.  It took me a while to realize this and then it took another while to accept that such a thing could happen in the basement of a small town church in Upstate New York.

I sneaked miracle stories in on the blog posts.  I sneaked them on the pages of   “I Don’t Hang Out in Churches Anymore”.  Finally, I gave them their own pages – as much as I had the nerve for anyway,  in a short book “Miracles”.

Research on miracles taught me some things.

I learned that miracles often include weeping statues, broken legs healing  straight,  relics, stigmata, and visions.  The pantry miracles included none of those things.

Our miracles never really cured anyone.  I never saw a statue weep, and no one came down with stigmata.

Instead, they  showed us all how to grow and love and forgive.  It was giving away the food that was the tip off for me.

As far as I can tell, the food pantry miracles were not the result of prayer.

God just showed up and brought food.  Once he came disguised as a fireman.  Each miracle was a complete surprise, a unique and different event.  God came when the pantry shelves were bare and the lines were long.

I don’t think the miracles proved that any of the shoppers or volunteers were more  faithful than anybody else in town.   Frankly, I think that some of us saw the miracles as coincidences or something.

However they were seen, these events made an impact on a small number of people who saw them as they happened.

The clincher for me occurred when I finally realized and accepted a few basic things:

Carloads of food never showed up when we didn’t need it.

Boots never appeared on the shelves disguised as toothpaste in the summertime.

Nobody ever brought a handful of nails to fix the barn when the wall wasn’t falling.

Two books appeared on my desk out of the ethers:  “Miracles” by Tim Stafford and “Looking for a Miracle” by Joe Nickell gave a feeling of legitimacy to my thoughts and memories.

Because of Tim Stafford,  I wrote my book entitled “Miracles”.    He was direct about a few things – one of them being that people should not spread “miracle gossip”.  Because of his feelings about what he called “miracle gossip”,  I’m compelled to relate the pantry miracle stories.

To sneak them in  blog posts  does not do them justice.

Thank you for reading this blog post.  Please refer it to your favorite social media network.

Thurman Greco

 

Can We Break Down Barriers in this Pandemic? Food Insecure

Starving Seniors?  Food insecure seniors?  Are those terms too harsh?

Let’s ratchet them down:  hungry.

Or maybe:  food insecure.  Yeah, that’s better.  It sounds better anyway.

Call it what you want, the event is the same.  It’s your grandmother or grandfather (or me…I’m certainly a grandmother) caught in a situation where there’s simply not enough food in the house.  They are food insecure.

In these times, we seniors living on Social Security are finding ourselves routinely choosing between food and medicine, food and transportation.

I have two friends who daily hitch rides to the grocery store because their cars don’t work any more.  Here, in the middle of this health crisis, they are in a desperate situation not of their making.  Everyone is trying to shelter in place, wear face masks and gloves, practice social distancing, and find a friend to help  get food.

Walking to a store is totally out for one:  her hip and knee replacements won’t allow it.  And, we’re not supposed to be out in public anyway.

And, how can a person buy a used car these days anyway?  And, when the car gives up the ghost, how will we get to work?  Yes, I know lots of seniors who are figuring out ways to bring in $$$.

The issues with seniors and food insecurity are serious because when seniors no longer have $$$ to  buy the food they need for nutrition or when they can no longer buy the medicines they need, they become ill and finally end up being cared for by their children or they end up in a nursing home.

I know many stories about:

The senior in Woodstock living on mashed potatoes.

The older woman in Bearsville who ended up in a nursing home when  her take-out food pantry cut her off and she couldn’t get to a grocery store.

The older man who lacks $$$ for enough food and is slowly starving.

There is food available:

If they can get to a food pantry or If they can find a pantry offering takeout

If they can sign up for SNAP (food stamps).

If they have the strength to deal with long lines and frazzled volunteers.

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I spoke recently with a retired man I know:

“Richard, do you get SNAP?”

“No.”

“Why, Richard?  SNAP is usually easy to get.  All you have to do is apply.”
“Well, I’m getting by without it.  Let someone else, needier than me, get the $$$  Besides, I hear the lines are outrageous.”

“Richard, think about getting SNAP.  This is a benefit you paid for.  Why leave $$$ on the table?”

The barriers to SNAP for seniors are great.  Seniors resist going to a pantry, soup kitchen, getting SNAP until they simply cannot resist any longer.  I know the feeling.  People in my age category grew up and entered adulthood feeling that if we worked hard and paid our taxes, we would end up okay.  We worked all our lives with this attitude and now that we’re retired…there simply isn’t enough.

When this happens, we feel inadequate and blame ourselves.  “I must have done something wrong.  Here I am living hand-to-mouth.  I don’t even have enough $$$ for food.  What did I do wrong?”

We are a whole generation of people blaming ourselves.  I feel like we’re really not totally to blame for being food insecure.

I tell myself the rules have changed.  This pandemic has shifted everything.  Because we’re retired, we’re not in the rules-making game anymore.

Whatever happened to the Grey Panthers?

Thank you for reading this article.  Please refer it to your favorite social media network.

Thurman Greco

 

No Fixed Address

“No Fixed Address” is dedicated to those in our country with no roof over their heads.  See your neighbors, your friends, your relatives, in new ways as they describe their daily lives in their own words.

The people in this new book reveal themselves to be both brave and fearless as they go about their activities:  work, laundry, children’s homework, appointments.  Mostly they live like the rest of us.  They just have no roof over their heads.

“No Fixed Address” is my newest book in the Unworthy Hungry series.  It’s easy to read and understand.  You won’t be bored, not even for a minute.

I hope you’ll order it today.  Get an extra copy for a friend!

This book has an extra surprise.  When you get a copy, you’ll be making a donation to a good cause.  You’ll be fighting hunger and homelessness.

It doesn’t get much better than that!

Thank you for reading this article!

Please forward it to your preferred social media network.

Thurman Greco

Situational Poor

SITUATIONAL POOR – A person fits into a situational category of poverty when s/he lands in a situation created by an event such as a hurricane, fire, flood, pandemic,   or other disaster which destroys the home, job, car.

Food pantries, food banks, soup kitchens are overworked in today’s pandemic world.  The line of hungry people grows every time the place opens.

It’s bad enough that the line grows weekly.  But, worse, many people in the line are confused, afraid.  The never thought they would find themselves in a food pantry line with hundreds of other hungry, confused, afraid.

How should they act?  What should they do?

What do they do with the food, once they get it home?  It may be good food – both delicious and nutritious.  However, it may not be anything recognizable.  More often than not, pantry food doesn’t come with recipes.  Super markets carry thousands of items.  Food pantries carry maybe 50 different items and the labels on the cans and boxes aren’t even recognizable.  The fresh produce may be organic but not be labeled as such.

So, now that the pantry food is in its new found kitchen, there is a big adjustment period involved in getting it to the table.

We are not so far removed from those people in the food pantry.  They are our neighbors, friends, co-workers, relatives, classmates.

And, truth be told, we are all confused, and afraid.

Even though you may not be in the line, there are definitely things you can do.  For starters, send a check to a food pantry, soup kitchen,  or food bank in your area.  If you don’t know where to send the check, look up an organization called:

Feeding America.

Feeding America is glue holding the food pantry world together.  If that doesn’t work for you, search out:  Regional Food Bank of Northeastern New York.

The Regional Food Bank of Northeastern New York, along with the Food Bank of the Hudson Valley, do an amazing job of making delicious, nutritious foods available to those who need it most.

These two food banks are only two in a large network of food banks located throughout the country.  If you seeking a feeding facility in another part of the country, these organizations can guide you to one in the area best for you.

If you are uncomfortable sending money, this might be a good time to organize a food drive.

I wrote three action guides which list suggestions and options which are easy-to-understand and read.  You can get these action guides free.  Email me your mailing address and I’ll get your copies in the mail right away.  I’m not even charging postage and handling.

Email me your mailing address to thurmangreco@gmail.com.

The guidelines and suggestions are practical.  I feel confident you’ll discover practical things you can do to help on one of the action guides.

Thank you for caring.

Thanks for reading this article.  Please refer it to your preferred social media network.

Thurman Greco

Woodstock, New York

 

Hungry People

When an economy tanks, hungry people find the food pantry.   The tanked economy of 2008 has been referred to many times in the past few days on the news.  References to past broken economies  are made every day.

The situation is very different this time, but for the  hungry people, the situation  is the same.

In 2008, New York got with the program quickly, it seemed. The Hunger Prevention Nutrition Assistance Program people handed down guidelines mandating specific foods for the pantry room.  Produce, whole-grain bread, eggs, dairy products appeared on the shelves.  Crowds and an ever-lengthening hallway line became the norm.

In Woodstock, the pantry attracted several hundred hungry people to its basement room every pantry day.  The line formed outside the door at 1:00 for the 3:00 opening, regardless of the weather.  Hungry people who visited the pantry a week ago and took home groceries, would today be out of food and need more.

Today, in 2020, some pantries are closed.  That puts even more pressure on the pantries that are open.  Food pantry volunteers are not only serving more and more hungry people because of the layoffs of the pandemic.  They are also serving people who shopped at the now-closed pantries.

When people live close to the edge,  they have no reliable cushion.   They’ve lived in a situation where they make choices every day:  food or medicine, food or rent, food or gas.  Now, when the coronavirus strikes, they have no either/or choices.

Food pantry volunteers take precautions.  They take temperatures as volunteers enter the pantry.  Volunteers wash hands repeatedly and  adhere to the six-foot social distancing guidelines.

But the need for food is not imaginary.

Volunteers are realistic.  They can’t kid themselves into believing nothing will happen to them because they feed  hungry people.  They know they’re taking chances.  They also know they are doing a needed job.  For many volunteers, it’s something they need to do.

There are no words for this feeling.

I have a small thank-you gift for you.  All you have to do is email your name and mailing address to me at thurmangreco@gmail.com and I’ll send you, free of charge, with no strings attached, a small book about a food pantry I used to work in – “Miracles”.

Thank you for all you do…not only for volunteering in a food pantry but also for shopping at a food pantry.  Your actions are courageous.  Following your inner moral compass is also courageous.

Please refer this article to your preferred social media network.

Thurman Greco

 

 

Good Neighbor Food Pantry and Woodstock Library Close

 

“Woodstock is completely packed with Coronavirus refugees from Brooklyn.  We’re doing more business here in the post office than we have every done.  This post office is busier than any Christmas rush has ever been.”

What a day!

I got a call from someone earlier today.  “The food pantry is closed, Thurman. How can this happen?”  As I went by the Woodstock Library, I saw a sign:  “Closed”

The Coronavirus affects us all.  We cannot avoid the reality.  People jokingly call our community Brooklyn North.

As long as you have a car and money and an apartment and a cell phone and a  computer, all you have to worry about is the spread of germs.  But, that’s not how it is with everyone.  Without a car and money and an apartment and a computer and a call phone, your life tells a different story.

Without those luxuries, your lifeline requires a food pantry and a library.

The library is essential because it’s your ticket to information about  food, housing, and anything else you need to find.  A library will help you find everything you need to survive.  And, while it’s giving you information, a library roof keeps you dry.  The walls of the library keep you warm and comfortable while you seek all that you need.

And, of course, the library has one other luxury people don’t talk about much: a bathroom.   If you are without food and a roof and a computer and a cell phone, a bathroom is essential.

So, while the Woodstock Reformed Church has closed its doors, most of the food pantries in New York state are figuring out how to get food to people.  They are receiving support from the Food Bank.

In fact, the Food Bank of the Hudson Valley reports that volunteers are responding to every emergency request received.  This includes food deliveries to seniors, quarantined and high-risk individuals, school back pack programs.

If you can get to a phone, there are a couple of phone numbers you can call.  Try 845-399-0376 or 845-633-2120.

Sources tell me that many  food pantries and soup kitchens are not closed.  I truly hope you can find one.

So, what can we do?  Well, for starters, try to contact people you know but seldom see and find out how they are doing.  Do they need anything?  Is there anything you  can do?

Contact food pantries and soup kitchens in your area and see if they need anything.  My bet is that they do.  My bet is they need food.

Times are serious.  Your help is needed!

If you run out of ideas, contact me at thurmangreco@gmail and I’ll send you, free of charge, my three action guides with practical tips for fighting hunger and homelessness.

Thank you for reading this article.  Please refer it to your preferred social media network.

Thanks again!

Thurman Greco